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SUNY Cortland Personal Training Conference

On April 2nd in Sperry 105 SUNY Cortland will be hosting a personal training conference with the focus on helping individuals improve their health through behavioral change strategies. This conference has been approved for .6 CEU’s through the NSCA. The titles of the presentations are as follows:

·         Obesity: Beyond Eat Less, Move More – Dr. Spencer Nadolsky (M.D.)

·         The Art of Coaching- Tony Gentilcore (C.S.C.S)

·         Creating Environments for Sustainable Change- Mark Fisher (C.P.T)

·         Ideal strategies for caloric control: to count or not?- Cassandra Forsythe (PhD, R.D.)

·         Environmental triggers to eating behavior – John Brand (PhD)

Cassandra Forsythe (PhD): will discuss the behavioral science behind why people eat the way they do. Her discussion will include recommendations to help clients improve their eating habits

Tony Gentilcore (C.S.C.S): will provide practical coaching advice for students who will enter the personal training/ strength and conditioning profession.

John Brand (PhD): will discuss the environmental triggers that contribute to eating behavior. He will share research conducted at Cornell’s Food and Brand lab that will be applicable for personal trainer who wish to help their clients eat healthier.

Spencer Nadolsky (M.D.): will discuss the medical side of obesity and why current recommendations that personal trainers give their overweight clients may not be enough.

Mark Fisher (C.P.T): will discuss strategies his gym utilizes to help motivate and retain their clients at Mark Fisher Fitness in New York City.

Be sure to send your registration in early to make sure you get a spot and the early registration discount! (click me –>2016 personal training conference brochure)

Or Click on the link below for online registration!

https://commerce.cashnet.com/KINES

If you’re not sold yet check out Mark Fishers video from last year!

 

 

 


SUNY Cortland Personal Training Conference

Hi all,

I  very excited to announce that Cortland’s third conference will take place on Saturday April 2nd. This years conference is going to focus heavily on how personal trainer can help their clients become healthier and happier people. We have an excellent line up of speakers who can cover a wide variety of topics that relate to health and wellness coaching. Our speakers include Spencer Nadolsky, Mark Fisher, Cassandra Foresythe, John Brand, and Tony Gentilcore. Each speaker will present on a unique topic. Attendees at this conference will receive .6 CEU’s from the National Strength and Conditioning Association!

Here is a quick overview of the speakers topics

Session Description

 

Cassandra Forsythe (PhD): Cassandra Forsythe will discuss the behavioral science behind why people eat the way they do. Her discussion will include recommendations to help clients improve their eating habits

Tony Gentilcore (C.S.C.S): Tony Gentilcore will provide practical coaching advice for students who will enter the personal training/ strength and conditioning profession.

John Brand (PhD): John Brand will discuss the environmental triggers that contribute to eating behavior. He will share research conducted at Cornell’s Food and Brand lab that will be applicable for personal trainer who wish to help their clients eat healthier.

Spencer Nadolsky (M.D.): Spencer Nadolsky will discuss the medial side of obesity and why current recommendations that personal trainers give their overweight clients may not be enough. He will also discuss how personal trainers and medical doctors can form professional relationships.

Mark Fisher (C.P.T): Mark Fisher will discuss strategies his gym utilizes to help motivate and retain their clients at Mark Fisher Fitness in New York City.

 

Please find the registration flyer in the link below

2016 personal training conference brochure


2nd Annual Strength and Conditioning/ Personal Training Symposium at SUNY Cortland

conference flyer

Above is the info for the conference this weekend. See you all there!


Top 5 Mobility Movements People Should be Performing Before Their Workout

 

The following is guest post from Nancy Newell. I’ve known Nancy for a couple years now and have been impressed with her work ethic, desire to learn, and network with smart people in the fitness industry. She’ll be making an impact soon enough. Oh and she’s really strong too!

nancy deadlift

  

Mobility and stability go hand in hand. Mobility is the ability to produce a desired movement where as stability is the ability to resist an undesired movement. Together they play crucial role in a successful strength-training program. So called corrective drills have been touted as having the ability to help alter posture along with improving range of motion. Here are some things you should consider and questions you should ask yourself when implementing mobility exercises prior to your training program.

(1) At what point is ‘bad’ posture detrimental? I’m guessing it’s different for different people because different people have different movement capabilities. For example, McGill did one study where he measured hip extension range of motion and some people had 16 degrees and some people had negative hip extension range of motion! So if a person with 16 degrees of hip extension ROM was lordotic and had an ATP they could probably still lock out their deadlift without stressing their lumbar spine but if someone had 3 degrees if hip extension ROM and were also lordotic and in ATP they might stress their lumbar to lock out. Make sense? you have to look at movement capabilities even before posture.

(2) Can a few gym movements really change posture? I would say the literature doesn’t really support that. McGill again, actually did have one where he did stretching and strengthening for people with hypo and hyper lordosis and turns out they did change their posture but that was a small sample size. Other reviews would say it isn’t that easy. Since posture is based on habits and what we do all day 10 minutes of correctives probably wouldn’t undo it, kind of like saying you can eat like shit but if you exercise for 30 minutes it will undo it.

(3) What is the main determinant in “good” or “bad”? Posture according to Muscles Testing and Function with Posture and Pain. In summary Kendall states “The position of the pelvis is the key to good or faulty postural alignment. The muscles that maintain good alignment of the pelvis both anteropsoteriorly and laterally, are the upmost importance to maintain good overall alignment. An Imbalance between muscles that oppose each other in the standing position changes the alignment of the pelvis, and adversely affects the posture of the body parts both above and below”

(4) As stated above cultural patterns of 21st century aide in accumulating stress to the structures of the human body by repetitive specialized activities such as ones day job. Correction of certain conditions requires good body mechanics, range of joint motion must be adequate but not excessive. Kendell states “ the more flexibility, the less stability; the mores stability, the less flexibility” So should the goal  be to achieve a happy medium? Ensuring we achieve stability at joints that are unstable and achieve an adequate range of motion at joints that are lacking adequate range of motion?

With all these points to consider here are several drills that you can start doing in your warm up today.

The following exercise over time with proper body mechanics during daily life will aide in achieving an increase of ROM by moving joints through a proper range of motion and adding stability to structures of the body for protection against injury.

  • The Dead-bug

Stability: Anterior core, lumbar

Mobility: shoulder, hip

  • T-Spine Extension and Rotation.

Stability: Scapula, lumbar spine

Mobility: Thoracic Spine

  • Bird Dog’s

Stability: Anterior, lateral, rotary core

Mobility: Hip, shoulder

  • Glute Bridge Iso holds

Stability: Core, knee

Mobility: Ankle, hip,

 

 

  • Yoga Push-ups

Stability: Scapula, core

Mobility: Ankle, shoulder, hip

Conclusion:

  1. You have to look at movement capabilities before posture.
  2. Look at daily living habits and how you can correct “bad” body biomechanics during every day life activities
  3. If you don’t move your joints through an adequate ROM over time you will lose your ROM and it will adversely affect the body parts above and below that joint.
  4. Achieve stability at joints that are unstable, and increase ROM at joints that lack ROM

2015 Strength and Conditioning Symposium

Hi all,

More details to be coming every week but here is the registration sheet for the 2015 Strength and Conditioning/ Personal Training Symposium! Once you sign up I will personally email you with all of the directions on how to get to Cortland and will keep you updated as the event gets closer. As of now we are trying to move location (still on campus) but to a place closer to a gym for hands on activities.

Speakers will include

Tony Gentilcore

Joy Victoria

Mark Fisher

Nick Tumminello

A hands on session will also be conducted by John Gaglione

flyer and registration  –> all the details as well as the registration sheet can be found here

Also if you’re wondering why you should go, check out some awesome clips from last years seminar


Important considerations for tracking training volume

 

Volume is a vital factor in training success. Plain and simple if you want to get bigger and stronger you have to do more work. In my last few months of training I’ve been tracking my volume (frequency x reps x sets) for each day and exercise. I’ve seen some pretty great results, hitting a 560 deadlift and a 275 bench press (I really struggle with bench, it’s an accomplishment).

Notes:

*for the sake of this article strength will be mentioned but we will focus mainly on muscle growth. High training intensities need to be utilized for muscle strength whereas variable training intensities can be used for hypertrophy. *

Here’s what you do when you track your volume: (more…)


A simple approach to programming and progression (template attached)

This text corresponds with the attached excel sheet. The purpose of this is to make programming a resistance training routine easy for trainers and for people looking to put a program together for themselves.

Whenever considering how to create and progress a program the main variables that need to be considered are exercise selection, training volume, and exercise intensity. There are of course more (bar speed, rest periods,…) but these are the main variables that are of concern.

On the first page these three variables have been covered. There are different rep and set loading protocols with examples of progressions for each. This increases the training volume.

For example, if you or a client were squatting 135 pounds for 3 sets of 12 a progression would be 3 sets of 15 with the same weight.

Listed also are movement categories. Exercise variety is important so if you do a traditional back squat for 4 weeks, on the 5th training week swap it out for a box squat. This example has been given on sheet two.

Sheet three is an example of an intermediate program where intensity is modified on the second training phase (+5-10 pounds) and then the reps increase on the third training phase. Hopefully this provides an easy to follow outline for people looking to put together training programs.

It is useful to block out training phases (3-6 weeks) and then pick a variable to change (exercise selection, intensity, or volume) with each training cycle.

programming made simple

 


Seven upper body finishing exercises

 

A ‘finisher’ is a nice way to conclude a training session. You can organize a finisher to accumulate a little bit more training volume which will help increase muscle size or you could use a finisher as a conditioning tool which will aid in fat loss. Finishers should be grueling, they’re mentally tough just as much as they are physically tough. Here are seven upper body finishers that you can incorporate into your training programs today.

TRX row complex

For the TRX row complex you need a chin up bar to set the TRX up on. You will do 15 rows, on the 15th row begin a 30 second static hold. Repeat this three times with one minute rest in between sets. Static hold time will decrease from 30 seconds on the first round to 20 seconds on the second round to 15 seconds on the last round.

  • Set 1: 15 rows, 30 second hold, 60 seconds rest
  • Set 2: 15 rows, 20 second hold, 60 seconds rest
  • Set 3: 15 rows, 15 second hold

row1

TRX curl complex

Treat this complex is a similar way to the previous one. You will be following the same plan of 15 reps with 30, 20, and 15 second static holds. However, for this exercise you will be doing a curl rather than a row.

  • Set 1: 15 curls, 30 second hold, 60 seconds rest
  • Set 2: 15 curls, 20 second hold, 60 seconds rest
  • Set 3: 15 curls, 15 second hold

curl2curl

TRX bear hug complex

This is the last of the TRX exercises. For this exercise you will start in a row position then rapidly cross your hands like you’re grabbing someone to tackle them. Do 15 reps then proceed with the same static hold routine.

  • Set 1: 15 hugs, 30 second hold, 60 seconds rest
  • Set 2: 15 hugs, 20 second hold, 60 seconds rest
  • Set 3: 15 hugs, 15 second hold

bear hug

Spider man pushup with medicine ball toss

For this exercise you need two medicine balls separated by about twenty feet. Start with 10 rapid medicine ball tosses to the wall followed by spiderman walking pushups to the next medicine ball. Complete 10 more tosses. This is one round. Rest 30-60 seconds and repeat two more times.

Three point pushups

Three point pushups are a great upper body finisher that I borrowed from strength coach Nick Tumminello. Put your feet up on a bench and do pushups until failure. Next, go into a regular pushup position and do pushups to failure. Finally put your hands on a bench and do pushups until failure. This can be a stand alone finisher or you can do it for 2-3 sets.

3pt 3 3pt 2 3pt1

20’s

20’s are a great way to accumulate some extra volume. Pick a difficult exercise like the overhead press, squat, or bench press and couple it with an exercise that is less demanding but still works the same muscles. For example. Lateral raises, lunges, or pushups. In this example we will use a kettlebell overhead press. Pick a weight you can do around 12-15 times and rep it out (maximum number of possible reps). Subtract the number you get from 20 and do that number for the less challenging exercise, in this case lateral raises. An example of three sets would look like this

  • Set 1: 16 overhead presses 4 lateral raises, rest two minutes
  • Set 2: 12 overhead presses 8 lateral raises, rest two minutes
  • Set 3: 9 overhead presses, 11 lateral raises

overhead press lateral raise

Back complex

Strength coach James Smith introduced this to me this summer. You’ll need two pairs of weights, a heavy pair for rows and a lighter pair for reverse flys. For the first set do 30 rows and 15 reverse flys. You may not be able to do 30 or 15 repetitions in a row and that’s okay. You’re allowed to rest on intervals of 5 for 5 seconds. So if you get to rep 20 and are fatigued put the weight down and rest for 5 seconds. The first round is actually the easiest round. For the second round you do 40 rows and 20 reverse flys and for the third round do 50 rows and 25 reverse flys. Rest for 2-4 minutes in between sets.

row reverse fly

 

Try incorporating one or two of these finishers every week at the end of an upper body training day to add some variety and extra training volume.


Charity deadlift meet in 1 month and Strength and Conditioning/Personal Training Symposium!

Hi all,

 

The charity deadlift even for Golisanos Childrens Hospital is less than a month away so be sure to get your registrations in so I can plan the order for the lifters. Also please share this with friends!

SUNY CORTLAND DEADLIFT CHARITY

 

Also, .5 CEU’s have been approved for the Strength and Conditioning/Personal Training Symposium at Cortland which will be held on March 28th. Speakers include Tony Gentilcore, Nick Tumminello, Cassandra Forsythe, and Mark Fisher. We have a massive range of topics from building a fitness business to training around lower body injuries. John Gaglione will also be hosting a hands on deadlifting session.  Registration info and scheduling information is below

2015 strength and conditioning & personal training symposium

symposium details

 

 


CORTLAND CHARITY DEADLIFT COMPETITION

Hi all, we’re less than 2 months away, registrations have been coming in for this event so if you haven’t signed up yet be sure to do so soon! Information is in the PDF below

 

SUNY CORTLAND DEADLIFT CHARITY